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Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #1
Sparks
 
Default Transfer Swithes

Hi,

I am looking for a source in the UK to purchase a transfer switch

The requirements are, 100A feed from the grid, and 30A feed from the
generator

The only one I can seem to find is the Briggs & Stratton "BST9200M" seen
here http://www.toolsnextday.ltd.uk/Gener...generators.htm

This unit is a whopping 210.00 - this seems a tad expensive for a switch!

I don't need one with a RCD, as I will have it wired before my consumer unit
which already has two!

Any recommendations would be much appreciated!

Sparks...



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Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #2
Bob M.
 
Default Re: Transfer Swithes

I agree, they are expensive. Here in the states I bought one rated for 100A
that cost about $700. However I would like to point out a few reasons why
they cost more than one would think is necessary.

First, the switch has to be able to transfer 100 amps, whether it's from the
generator or the commercial wires, so you won't find one rated for lower
current on one side (usually). Your generator will have its own limiting
circuit breaker in it which may be lower than the ratings on the switch.

The switch is designed so it's physically impossible to connect the
generator and commercial power at the same time. And it will be rated for
the maximum voltage used in your country, and pass all the government
inspections and codes for the intended use.

The one I bought cost me $700 here. It has an intelligent battery charger to
keep the generator's battery up to the proper voltage during prolonged
periods of non-use, and a logic board that controls the entire system
operation. It automatically:
1. senses the incoming main line for voltage and frequency limits.
2. starts the generator if the main power fails or goes out of range for 5
or more seconds.
3. waits about 20 seconds for the generator to stabilize, once it detects
proper generator voltage and frequency.
4. transfers the house (load) from the mains to the generator.
5. transfers the house back to the mains when the power there has returned
for 5 minutes.
6. lets the generator run to cool itself for 5 minutes after transferring
power back to the mains.
7. shuts the generator off.
8. exercises the generator so it runs for 30 minutes every 1, 2, or 4 weeks,
with or without transferring the house to it.
9. detects various faults.
10. allows manual operation for testing and over-riding.

Now all that electronics may not seem like much, but everything is totally
automatic. During the last power failure we had here (the "big" blackout of
August 2003) I came home to find my generator happily purring in the back
yard and all but one clock inside keeping the correct time. Apparently the
voltage sagged to 102 or lower, and the generator started and took the load
for 90 minutes until the voltage came back to 110 (nominal is 120 here). In
the mean time, I sat in front of my television set and used my computer just
like nothing was wrong.

Yes, you do have to pay for all that luxury.

Now you could get a manual transfer switch for much less, but some of the
bigger ones really require a muscle-man to flip the lever, so that's
something to think about if you might not be the one doing the switching if
the power should fail at your house.

I hope this gives you some insight into why the automatic switches cost so
much.
Bob M.
======
"Sparks" <this.is@real.com> wrote in message news:3f74a348_4@127.0.0.1...
> Hi,
>
> I am looking for a source in the UK to purchase a transfer switch
>
> The requirements are, 100A feed from the grid, and 30A feed from the
> generator
>
> The only one I can seem to find is the Briggs & Stratton "BST9200M" seen
> here http://www.toolsnextday.ltd.uk/Gener...generators.htm
>
> This unit is a whopping 210.00 - this seems a tad expensive for a switch!
>
> I don't need one with a RCD, as I will have it wired before my consumer

unit
> which already has two!
>
> Any recommendations would be much appreciated!
>
> Sparks...
>
>
>



  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #3
Bob M.
 
Default Re: Transfer Swithes

I agree, they are expensive. Here in the states I bought one rated for 100A
that cost about $700. However I would like to point out a few reasons why
they cost more than one would think is necessary.

First, the switch has to be able to transfer 100 amps, whether it's from the
generator or the commercial wires, so you won't find one rated for lower
current on one side (usually). Your generator will have its own limiting
circuit breaker in it which may be lower than the ratings on the switch.

The switch is designed so it's physically impossible to connect the
generator and commercial power at the same time. And it will be rated for
the maximum voltage used in your country, and pass all the government
inspections and codes for the intended use.

The one I bought cost me $700 here. It has an intelligent battery charger to
keep the generator's battery up to the proper voltage during prolonged
periods of non-use, and a logic board that controls the entire system
operation. It automatically:
1. senses the incoming main line for voltage and frequency limits.
2. starts the generator if the main power fails or goes out of range for 5
or more seconds.
3. waits about 20 seconds for the generator to stabilize, once it detects
proper generator voltage and frequency.
4. transfers the house (load) from the mains to the generator.
5. transfers the house back to the mains when the power there has returned
for 5 minutes.
6. lets the generator run to cool itself for 5 minutes after transferring
power back to the mains.
7. shuts the generator off.
8. exercises the generator so it runs for 30 minutes every 1, 2, or 4 weeks,
with or without transferring the house to it.
9. detects various faults.
10. allows manual operation for testing and over-riding.

Now all that electronics may not seem like much, but everything is totally
automatic. During the last power failure we had here (the "big" blackout of
August 2003) I came home to find my generator happily purring in the back
yard and all but one clock inside keeping the correct time. Apparently the
voltage sagged to 102 or lower, and the generator started and took the load
for 90 minutes until the voltage came back to 110 (nominal is 120 here). In
the mean time, I sat in front of my television set and used my computer just
like nothing was wrong.

Yes, you do have to pay for all that luxury.

Now you could get a manual transfer switch for much less, but some of the
bigger ones really require a muscle-man to flip the lever, so that's
something to think about if you might not be the one doing the switching if
the power should fail at your house.

I hope this gives you some insight into why the automatic switches cost so
much.
Bob M.
======
"Sparks" <this.is@real.com> wrote in message news:3f74a348_4@127.0.0.1...
> Hi,
>
> I am looking for a source in the UK to purchase a transfer switch
>
> The requirements are, 100A feed from the grid, and 30A feed from the
> generator
>
> The only one I can seem to find is the Briggs & Stratton "BST9200M" seen
> here http://www.toolsnextday.ltd.uk/Gener...generators.htm
>
> This unit is a whopping 210.00 - this seems a tad expensive for a switch!
>
> I don't need one with a RCD, as I will have it wired before my consumer

unit
> which already has two!
>
> Any recommendations would be much appreciated!
>
> Sparks...
>
>
>



  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #4
Zathera
 
Default Re: Transfer Swithes


"Sparks" <this.is@real.com> wrote in message news:3f74a348_4@127.0.0.1...
> Hi,
>
> I am looking for a source in the UK to purchase a transfer switch
>
> The requirements are, 100A feed from the grid, and 30A feed from the
> generator
>
> The only one I can seem to find is the Briggs & Stratton "BST9200M" seen
> here http://www.toolsnextday.ltd.uk/Gener...generators.htm
>
> This unit is a whopping 210.00 - this seems a tad expensive for a switch!
>
> I don't need one with a RCD, as I will have it wired before my consumer

unit
> which already has two!
>
> Any recommendations would be much appreciated!
>
> Sparks...


Cutler-Hammer, Square D (maybe telemecanique) Seimans
All make what your looking for. I doubt that you will find one with a dual
amperage. All I have seen are rated for the largest amperage.



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Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #5
Zathera
 
Default Re: Transfer Swithes


"Sparks" <this.is@real.com> wrote in message news:3f74a348_4@127.0.0.1...
> Hi,
>
> I am looking for a source in the UK to purchase a transfer switch
>
> The requirements are, 100A feed from the grid, and 30A feed from the
> generator
>
> The only one I can seem to find is the Briggs & Stratton "BST9200M" seen
> here http://www.toolsnextday.ltd.uk/Gener...generators.htm
>
> This unit is a whopping 210.00 - this seems a tad expensive for a switch!
>
> I don't need one with a RCD, as I will have it wired before my consumer

unit
> which already has two!
>
> Any recommendations would be much appreciated!
>
> Sparks...


Cutler-Hammer, Square D (maybe telemecanique) Seimans
All make what your looking for. I doubt that you will find one with a dual
amperage. All I have seen are rated for the largest amperage.



  Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2007, 06:35 PM   #6
mark Ransley
 
Default Re: Transfer Swithes

Generac has 30amp @ 240v , 6 circuit with 2 wattmeters for 200us it
handles my 7500watt generator and comes with an exterior box and extra
plugs and wire for exterior box to generator. priced seperatly you would
spend 300us. I beleive B&S owns generac.

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