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Old 06-07-2007, 02:44 PM   #7
gerry
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 11:18:53 GMT, "DaveG" <DAVEJGRATZ@myob.com> wrote:

>
>"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
>news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com.. .
>> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
>>
>> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
>> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd heater
>> system.
>>



>
>Ask your spa dealer what their repair response time is on winter service
>calls. A good dealer will know the need to get someone out there asap to
>replace the heater, or pumps, which is a very simple operation on most
>tubs.


The fastest turn around time it the world won't help if one is not there
to monitor the temperature.


>I woulnd't bother with a supplemental heater or power backup. Just
>keep your eye on things during the winter months. If your heater does go
>out, turn on the pump(s) they will help keep the water warm. If one pump
>goes, turn on the other. If you only have one, get service out there quick.
>A good dealer will be there for you.
>Really it takes a while for a well built spa to loose its heat. You are
>worrying too much.
>The only time I'd worry was for somene who got a cheap spa from Sam's club
>or Costco, and got one with sub par insulation. And no in house service
>support.


Again, you assume 24/7 monitoring to even know a problem exists.

My Spa dealer actually is very interested in any solution I find. His
major winter freeze up calls are from folks who didn't use the spa for a
few days and never noticed heater or control failure. I has yet to lose
the tub, but the plumbing inside the insulated enclosure but outside the
2nd layer of insulation on the tub is the most vulnerable. That's three
pumps, 50+ jets, heater itself (if it was a control failure or power
outage) all exposed to freezing temps within 2 days or so.

We also sustain 1-3 day power outages every 10 years or so do to a
noreaster. It appears keeping the enclosure airspace interior at 50 F or
so, will keep the tub from ever freezing and takes little power.

gerry

--

Personal home page - http://gogood.com

gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:45 PM   #8
Bonehenge
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 09:37:15 -0400, gerry <gerrry_net@gogood.com>
wrote:


>Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
>
>gerry



It won't help without power, but some spas turn on a high speed pump
if a heater fails. This notifies the owner that something is wrong,
and takes advantage of the fact that moving water freezes at a lower
temperature.

Barry
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:48 PM   #9
Paull
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater


On 22-Jun-2004, gerry <gerrry_net@gogood.com> actually said:

> >> >"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
> >> >news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com.. .
> >> >> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater
> >> >> failure.
> >> >>
> >> >> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and
> >> >> heater
> >> >> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd
> >> >> heater
> >> >> system.
> >> >>

>
> >> >How about an automotive tank heater, 1000-1500 watts. The one I had on
> >> >my
> >> >Dodge had a pump in it and it would move enough water to open the
> >> >tstat
> >> >even
> >> >in sub zero temps.
> >>
> >> Chlorine would destroy it, I'm looking for an air cavity heater that
> >> doesn't get too warm.

> >
> >You're using chlorine in your spa???

>
> do-clor-bromine combo with ozone generator. Bromine will aggressively
> attack a common auto type heater as well.
>
> >I live in New Mexico, the temp drops to
> >near zero in the winter. Last winter my heater failed and it took over 12
> >hours
> >for the temp to drop to 50 degrees. The mass of the water doesn't allow
> >it
> >to cool down very fast. I'm planning to put a wireless thermostat in the
> >spa
> >this coming winter to monitor the temp from inside my house. I would
> >never
> >consider a back-up heater.
> >

>
> Now, how about those 3 day weekends...


I haven't run into that problem yet but I don't have trouble finding someone
to check my spa when I'm not home. They have to bring their own towel...

Actually I do get nervous during the winter but if all systems fail I'll
just empty the spa and go from there.




--
It is said that the early bird gets the worm,
but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:48 PM   #10
gerry
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 02:29:19 GMT, "Paull" <no-mail@here.com> wrote:


>> Now, how about those 3 day weekends...

>
>I haven't run into that problem yet but I don't have trouble finding someone
>to check my spa when I'm not home. They have to bring their own towel...
>
>Actually I do get nervous during the winter but if all systems fail I'll
>just empty the spa and go from there.


Many spas. including mine can't be just drained. Pumps and piping have
locations below the drain level. One must take apart the plumbing to drain
all the water out of the pumps.

gerry


--

Personal home page - http://gogood.com

gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:48 PM   #11
gerry
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:22:37 GMT, Bonehenge
<Keep_it_in_the_newsgroup_please@aol.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 09:37:15 -0400, gerry <gerrry_net@gogood.com>
>wrote:
>
>
>>Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
>>
>>gerry

>
>
>It won't help without power, but some spas turn on a high speed pump
>if a heater fails. This notifies the owner that something is wrong,
>and takes advantage of the fact that moving water freezes at a lower
>temperature.
>


It's a myth that moving water changes freezing temperature. Just mixes it
up and adds heat via friction.

Mine also turns on the high speed pumps (two). That won't help at all if
the control module fails :-( I really was not addressing only the heater
element failing, to function, the pumps must operate as well.

gerry

--

Personal home page - http://gogood.com

gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:50 PM   #12
Greg
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

>Many spas. including mine can't be just drained. Pumps and piping have
>locations below the drain level. One must take apart the plumbing to drain
>all the water out of the pumps.


Back when I lived in the great frozen north I had the same delima. The answer
is RV antifreeze. I kept a few gallons for emergencies. You drain the tub, blow
out all the water you can with your shop vac (if you still have power), then
pour antifreeze in the piping.
I only had to do it once because of a power failure but it did work. Since then
my ex, who ended up with the house, spa etc
used boat heaters in the enclosure to save it in a power failure.
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