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Old 06-07-2007, 03:33 AM   #1
gerry
 
Default Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.

My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd heater
system.

It would appear, a low wattage (600?) air heater in the enclosed area set
to 50F or so would do well. I could also run this off of emergency power.

I can fit a consumer oil filled electric radiator inside the compartment.
They have the advantage of never getting very hot since the thermostat is
attached. Thus they should not damage anything. But they JUST fit.

I've also seen some oil filled baseboard units with separate thermostats.
I do not know if they might overheat and are pricey.

Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.

gerry

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gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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Old 06-07-2007, 03:34 AM   #2
SQLit
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater


"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com...
> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
>
> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd heater
> system.
>
> It would appear, a low wattage (600?) air heater in the enclosed area set
> to 50F or so would do well. I could also run this off of emergency power.
>
> I can fit a consumer oil filled electric radiator inside the compartment.
> They have the advantage of never getting very hot since the thermostat is
> attached. Thus they should not damage anything. But they JUST fit.
>
> I've also seen some oil filled baseboard units with separate thermostats.
> I do not know if they might overheat and are pricey.
>
> Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
>
> gerry


How about an automotive tank heater, 1000-1500 watts. The one I had on my
Dodge had a pump in it and it would move enough water to open the tstat even
in sub zero temps.


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Old 06-07-2007, 03:35 AM   #3
gerry
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 07:37:45 -0700, "SQLit" <SQLitnospam@cox.net> wrote:

>
>"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
>news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com.. .
>> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
>>
>> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
>> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd heater
>> system.
>>
>> It would appear, a low wattage (600?) air heater in the enclosed area set
>> to 50F or so would do well. I could also run this off of emergency power.
>>
>> I can fit a consumer oil filled electric radiator inside the compartment.
>> They have the advantage of never getting very hot since the thermostat is
>> attached. Thus they should not damage anything. But they JUST fit.
>>
>> I've also seen some oil filled baseboard units with separate thermostats.
>> I do not know if they might overheat and are pricey.
>>
>> Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
>>
>> gerry

>
>How about an automotive tank heater, 1000-1500 watts. The one I had on my
>Dodge had a pump in it and it would move enough water to open the tstat even
>in sub zero temps.


Chlorine would destroy it, I'm looking for an air cavity heater that
doesn't get too warm.

gerry


--

Personal home page - http://gogood.com

gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:42 PM   #4
Paull
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater


On 21-Jun-2004, gerry <gerrry_net@gogood.com> actually said:

> >"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
> >news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com.. .
> >> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
> >>
> >> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
> >> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd
> >> heater
> >> system.
> >>
> >> It would appear, a low wattage (600?) air heater in the enclosed area
> >> set
> >> to 50F or so would do well. I could also run this off of emergency
> >> power.
> >>
> >> I can fit a consumer oil filled electric radiator inside the
> >> compartment.
> >> They have the advantage of never getting very hot since the thermostat
> >> is
> >> attached. Thus they should not damage anything. But they JUST fit.
> >>
> >> I've also seen some oil filled baseboard units with separate
> >> thermostats.
> >> I do not know if they might overheat and are pricey.
> >>
> >> Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
> >>
> >> gerry

> >
> >How about an automotive tank heater, 1000-1500 watts. The one I had on my
> >Dodge had a pump in it and it would move enough water to open the tstat
> >even
> >in sub zero temps.

>
> Chlorine would destroy it, I'm looking for an air cavity heater that
> doesn't get too warm.


You're using chlorine in your spa??? I live in New Mexico, the temp drops to
near zero in the winter. Last winter my heater failed and it took over 12
hours
for the temp to drop to 50 degrees. The mass of the water doesn't allow it
to cool down very fast. I'm planning to put a wireless thermostat in the spa
this coming winter to monitor the temp from inside my house. I would never
consider a back-up heater.

Paull

--
It is said that the early bird gets the worm,
but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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Old 06-07-2007, 02:43 PM   #5
DaveG
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater


"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com...
> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
>
> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd heater
> system.
>
> It would appear, a low wattage (600?) air heater in the enclosed area set
> to 50F or so would do well. I could also run this off of emergency power.
>
> I can fit a consumer oil filled electric radiator inside the compartment.
> They have the advantage of never getting very hot since the thermostat is
> attached. Thus they should not damage anything. But they JUST fit.
>
> I've also seen some oil filled baseboard units with separate thermostats.
> I do not know if they might overheat and are pricey.
>
> Any other solutions for a anti-freeze or emergency power backup heater.
>
> gerry
>
> --
>
> Personal home page - http://gogood.com
>
> gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots


Ask your spa dealer what their repair response time is on winter service
calls. A good dealer will know the need to get someone out there asap to
replace the heater, or pumps, which is a very simple operation on most
tubs. I woulnd't bother with a supplemental heater or power backup. Just
keep your eye on things during the winter months. If your heater does go
out, turn on the pump(s) they will help keep the water warm. If one pump
goes, turn on the other. If you only have one, get service out there quick.
A good dealer will be there for you.
Really it takes a while for a well built spa to loose its heat. You are
worrying too much.
The only time I'd worry was for somene who got a cheap spa from Sam's club
or Costco, and got one with sub par insulation. And no in house service
support.


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Old 06-07-2007, 02:44 PM   #6
gerry
 
Default Re: Hot Tub/Spa backup heater

[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 04:13:59 GMT, "Paull" <no-mail@here.com> wrote:

>
>On 21-Jun-2004, gerry <gerrry_net@gogood.com> actually said:
>
>> >"gerry" <gerrry_net@gogood.com> wrote in message
>> >news:fiodd01fgt3vulu6r8jmtshbmocf5n925t@4ax.com.. .
>> >> I installed a spa last year but had reservation about heater failure.
>> >>
>> >> My spa has an insulated enclosure, removable sides. The pump and heater
>> >> have no backup. I live in a cold climate, so I'm considering an 2nd
>> >> heater
>> >> system.
>> >>


>> >How about an automotive tank heater, 1000-1500 watts. The one I had on my
>> >Dodge had a pump in it and it would move enough water to open the tstat
>> >even
>> >in sub zero temps.

>>
>> Chlorine would destroy it, I'm looking for an air cavity heater that
>> doesn't get too warm.

>
>You're using chlorine in your spa???


do-clor-bromine combo with ozone generator. Bromine will aggressively
attack a common auto type heater as well.

>I live in New Mexico, the temp drops to
>near zero in the winter. Last winter my heater failed and it took over 12
>hours
>for the temp to drop to 50 degrees. The mass of the water doesn't allow it
>to cool down very fast. I'm planning to put a wireless thermostat in the spa
>this coming winter to monitor the temp from inside my house. I would never
>consider a back-up heater.
>


Now, how about those 3 day weekends...

gerry

--

Personal home page - http://gogood.com

gerry misspelled in my email address to confuse robots
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